Life Story Links: Blog Roundup, March 20, 2018

 stories of interest to people who preserve family history and tell or write life stories
“The past, like the future, is indefinite and exists only as a spectrum of possibilities.” —Stephen Hawking

Of Interviewers...

LOVE AND LOSS
Personal historian Lisa O'Reilly, of Carpinteria, California, writes To Mom, With Love,” a most personal and urgent message that calls upon us all to capture our loved ones’ stories...before it is too late. 

THE STORIES THAT WE WEAVE
Amanda Lacson of NYC’s Family Archive Business LLC distills some of the lessons she learned at Columbia University’s Oral History MA workshops, and discusses how we, as biographers and personal historians, can earn and tell better stories for our clients.

MEMOIR MOTIVATED
“There’s no quicker way to rip us off the rollercoaster and park us on the granny-bench than to adverb your verbs.” Just one of the colorfully on-point writing tips in Cyndy Etler’s “How to Write Memoir So They Don’t Read It, They Live It.” 

SENIORS & THEIR STUFF
Discussions with professional organizers led MA-based Nancy West to discover interesting points of intersection between her work and theirs: How writing your memoir can help you declutter, destress, and maybe even downsize.

    ...and Interviewees

     Little Havana oral history exhibit

    THE PLACE THEY CALL HOME
    Miami’s iconic Little Havana neighborhood is home to an interactive museum exhibit that invites audiences to step into the daily lives of ten local residents whose passion, creativity, and penchant for history is ensuring that future generations will experience the Little Havana they know and love. Get a taste of their stories.

    WHAT’S IN A NAME?
    “We spend our life identifying ourselves by our name,” writes Karen Bender of Virginia-based Leaves of Your Life. “Your name will go on the cover of your book. Surely, your feelings about that name warrant a paragraph or two within its pages.”

    FIRST PERSON
    “I ate until I was stuffed full of memories.” Esmé Weijun Wang finds her way back to a beloved childhood dish.

    ...and a Few More Links!

    Short Takes